Education in the United States of America

Education in the United States of America

Education in the United States of America

Fensterwald, J. (2020, August 14). Ethnic studies mandate for California K-12 students gaining momentum in Legislature. EdSource. Retrieved from https://edsource.org/2020/ethnic-studies-mandate-for-california-k-12-students-gaining-momentum-in-legislature/638255

Assemblyman Jose Medina, has been busy amending Assembly Bill 331. This bill would require all students to take, at least, one-semester course of ethnic studies in order to graduate high school. Many concerns regarding the model of the curriculum has caused hesitation in its adoption. Concerns include: maintaining the neutrality of the subjects being discussed, not “watering-down” the content, creating an approachable and relevant model for all students, and the cost of mandating another graduation requirement. There is much revising surrounding this bill, with hope that by the end of this year, the bill will become law, scheduled to be in effect by 2024.


Ring, E. (2020, July 28). Waivers, lawsuits, pandemic pods and school choice legislation. California Policy Center. https://californiapolicycenter.org/waivers-lawsuits-pandemic-pods-and-school-choice-legislation/

Information on an ongoing battle between teaching unions and the government when it comes to opening schools. Teachers unions aren’t comfortable with sending staff back into schools but the local governments as well as the CDC seem to support the idea of reopening schools and think they are necessary for students to be able to succeed. In other states, they are suing the governor for opening schools. In Californian, there are those proposing to sue Governor Newsom for not reopening schools.


Postsecondary education: Higher Education Performance, Accountability, and Coordination Commission, A.B.130, (2019).

Assembly Bill 130 was introduced to the California Assembly in December 2018, it was passed in the Assembly and Senate in September 2019. This Bill the Higher Education Performance, Accountability, and Coordination Commission whose charge is the oversight, coordination, and planning entity for postsecondary education. AB130 allows the commission to “require the governing boards and institutions of public postsecondary education to submit specified information and student data to the commission on plans and programs, costs, selection and retention of students, enrollments, plant capacities, and other matters pertinent to the commission’s functions and responsibilities.” The commission is due to report Legislature on or before January 1, 2025.


Ring, E. (2020, July 16). L.A. Teachers Union: Give Us $250 Million, Or keep Schools Closed. California Policy Center. https://californiapolicycenter.org/l-a-teachers-union-give-us-250-million-or-keep-schools-closed/

Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) teachers in the United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA) released a statement outlining their concerns for the 2020-21 Academic Year amidst a pandemic. They argue that COVID-19 has disproportionately negative effects on people of color. UTLA makes its case that the students of LAUSD are is far more susceptible to contracting the disease due to their student’s unique demographics. LAUSD students are “more likely to live in higher-density housing, more likely to the liver in multi-generational households, more likely to live further away from medical care, [and] more likely to use mass transit”. In return, this makes the teacher susceptibility greater. UTLA is asking for a reduction in class sizes to no more than 12 students per in-person class and that personal protective equipment be provided for all students and staff.


Sand, L. (2020, July 21). School is canceled in California. California Policy Center. https://californiapolicycenter.org/school-is-canceled-in-california/

The California Teachers Association (CTA) and United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA) urge that in-person classes resuming in the fall is the wrong thing to do. UTLA released a 17-page paper – or as Ring refers to it, a manifesto – where they laced coronavirus concerns with political demands. Ultimately, Governor Gavin Newsom shut down in-person classes on July 17th. In contrast, the American Academy of Pediatrics argues that the lack of in-person classes will have far greater negative consequences on children’s development compared to the risk of resuming in-person courses. Governor Newsom has made his decision, only time will tell the consequences of his decision.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *